Environmental Special Topics:

Collaborative Environmental Activism & Leadership

Overview

 EVR 4930

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Plagiarism Warning

 

Required Texts:  

Bohman, James and Rehg, William (Eds.) (1997) Deliberative Democracy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Scarce, Rik (2016) Eco-Warriors. New York, NY: Routledge.

Wimberley, Edward T. (2018) Homegrown Ecopragmatics. Champaign, IL: Common Ground Publishing.

Wimberley, Edward T. and Pellegrino, Scott (2014) Ecopragmatics. Champaign, IL: Common Ground Publishing.

Wimberley, Edward T. (2009) Nested Ecology. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press.

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide students with a perspective on environmental activism versus environmental pragmatism as alternatives for providing solutions to environmental problems. It will reveiw the history of environmental radicalism in the U.S. and beyond and will look at tactics for environemtnal change and their outcomes. The course will then compare and contrast these radical approaches to ones involving compromise, cooperation, deliberative democracy and ecopragmatic partnering.

The course will be presented in two segments. The first six sessions will be devoted to introducing the student to the foundational ideas associated with environmental activism and environmental pragmatism - what this course refers to as ecopragmatics. The final seven sessions of the course will consist of a set of case studies that students are going to be asked to evaluate from the perspective of an activist and from the perspective of a pragmatist.

Students will be expected to become familiar with a broad range of issues associated with Environmental Activism to include:

  • Rhetoric of environmental activism and social justice
  • Participatory and deliberative democracy
  • Practical considerations in local environmental issues
  • Social change and cooperation versus confrontation
  • Considerations of economics and environment
  • Regulaltory and environmental management concerns
  • International trade
  • Historical contributors to current environmental issues

Students will likewise be expected to become familiar with a broad range of issues associated with Environmental Pragmatism (Ecopragmatics) to include:

  • Basic ecopragmatic principles
  • The role of "responsibles" in pragmatic problem solving
  • The virtues of local problem solving
  • The communitarian perspective to environmental action
  • Environmental activism versus environmental change
  • The limits of activist and pragmatic approaches to environmental problems
  • Environmental conflict versus cooperation

Objectives:

Students who complete this course will be able to: 

  1. Discuss the history and definition of environmetal activism and pragmatism.

  2. Discuss the interaction between confrontational and cooperative approaches to environmental change.

  3. Describe methods used by pragmatists and activists to realize environmental change

  4. Describe environmental policies that have evolved from environmental pragmatism and environmental activism.

  5. Understand how activist and pragmatism approaches are fruitfully appllied in selected environmental case studies.

  6. Enable students to utilize the APA documentation method to reflect where they draw the material they use in their written assignments.

 

Basic Course Requirements

ONE:

Attend and participate in class on a regular basis through weekly posting of homework on Canvas Email as Word attachments:

Class attendance is very important in this course. Class participation centers around participation in completing and posting homework and at Canvas Email. Homework completion counts as 50% for 10 week students during Summer C. Homework completion also reflects upon the class participation grade. Students must receive permission from the instructor to miss a class. Missing (i.e. nonparticipation or inadequate participation in class activities) for 3 classes or more without instructor permission will result in students being withdrawn from the class.

Homework submitted later than 5:00 p.m. on the final date of each class session will will be considered late homework and will not be credited toward class attendance and participation. Distance learning course are considered to operate over a seven day week period.

TWO:

Successfully complete the comprehensive examination during the class session set aside for that purpose.

The exam - accounting for 50% of your grade during 10 week Summer C sessions - will be administered via Canvas Email.

Grading Criteria:

 

  10 Week Grade Breakdown

Competency Exam  50%
Homework questions (Reflecting Attendance & Participation) 50%

 

Grading Scale

97-100%

A+

94-96%

A

90-93%

A-

87-89%

B+

84-86%

B

80-83%

B-

77-79%

C+

74-76%

C

70-73%

C-

67-69%

D+

64-66%

D

60-63%

D-

59% and Below

F

 

Homework submitted later than 5:00 p.m. on the final date of the class session will will be considered late homework and will not be credited toward class attendance and participation. Distance learning course are considered to operate over a seven day week period.

NOTE: Course assignments and schedule, course objectives, and grading criteria, distributions and weights may change as circumstances dictate and at the discretion of the instructor.

 

Prerequisites:

None

Homework Study Questions:

Completing Homework:

Students participating in class sessions will, on a weekly basis, prepare their homework assignments and post their responses to Canvas Email. All posted attachments must be in Word format. Homework written into the memo field of Canvas Email will not be graded. Likewise any homework turned in any format other than Word format or turned into any other email address will not be graded. The one exception is that homework turned in as "rich text format" (.rtf) will be accepted. Work turned in as pdf format will not be graded. All students are required to prepare written responses to the study questions assigned weekly, and are responsible for being prepared to answer and explain all questions. Make sure that in naming your Word file for the homework you are posting that you use short titles and only use letters and numbers in the title. Never use the # sign in the name of a file you are postings, since the software for the lesson board can't open any file with such a symbol in it.

Typically, students should expect to spend between 6 and 9 hours of course effort weekly. Some week's assignments may entail less time investment, while other class periods may entail more effort.

APA Documentation Method:

I strongly encourage every student to take the time to complete the following online APA Citation and Reference Tutorial offered by Harvard University. One of the objectives of this class is that you learn how to use the APA documentation style. You can learn everything you need to know about how to use this method by studying the material at the following sites. Please understand that any of your discussion questions or your student presentation papers that are lacking in complete APA styled documentation will be returned to you and will not be graded until they are in order.

APA Documentation Aids:

A Guide for Writing Research Papers in APA Style

Purdue University: Using American Psychological Association (APA) Format

APA Citation Styles - University of Toledo

APA Style Sheet (Cornell)

Quick Guide APA Style (UNC)

APA Guide to Electronic Resources

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding APA Style